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ZUZAX ♥¸.•*"Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ"*•.¸♥

curl left 22ndday ofJulyin the year2014 curl right
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chaosophia218:

Claude Paradin - Devises Heroïques, 1557.

(via bluecohosh)

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curl left 21stday ofJulyin the year2014 curl right
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(Source: doskapozora, via mortar-pistol)

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cinoh:

Man’s cap, England, late 16th century. Silk embroidered in silk and metallic yarns in split, back and couching stitches. 
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cinoh:

Man’s cap, England, late 16th century. Silk embroidered in silk and metallic yarns in split, back and couching stitches. 

(via sombhatt)

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curl left 20thday ofJulyin the year2014 curl right
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inneroptics:

Kati Horna.
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inneroptics:

Kati Horna.

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atlasobscura:

MARKET STREET CATACOMBS -INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Tunneled beneath the city streets with limestone and brick archways, the catacombs were used to transport and store meats and produce to be sold in the market before the days of refrigeration. The 20,000 square-foot subterranean area stayed cooler than the streets above, so they were used to help preserve food for the entire market overnight, waiting to be brought back aboveground the next day.
More than a century later, many parts of the catacombs remain remarkably intact, while others are crumbling to their limestone foundations. Thanks to the preservation of the City Market, the Indianapolis catacombs are one of only a dozen or so catacomb sites that still exist in America.
For more information and amazing places to explore, visit atlasobscura.com
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atlasobscura:

MARKET STREET CATACOMBS -INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA

Tunneled beneath the city streets with limestone and brick archways, the catacombs were used to transport and store meats and produce to be sold in the market before the days of refrigeration. The 20,000 square-foot subterranean area stayed cooler than the streets above, so they were used to help preserve food for the entire market overnight, waiting to be brought back aboveground the next day.

More than a century later, many parts of the catacombs remain remarkably intact, while others are crumbling to their limestone foundations. Thanks to the preservation of the City Market, the Indianapolis catacombs are one of only a dozen or so catacomb sites that still exist in America.

For more information and amazing places to explore, visit atlasobscura.com

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